Saturday, June 19, 2010

Should you transfer?

Question:
I just finished my sophomore year in an university in eastern europe (2 out of 3 years). the next year, i'll be an exchange student in an american university. it is a non-degree program. then i'll have to come back to my home country.

do you think i could apply during this exchange year to an american university and so i could get an american degree?
- Do the exchange year, apply to American universities while there, attend another American university after your exchange year and get your degree.


Answer:

You definitely could transfer and could change your status from exchange to regular. This could be easy/difficult, and this is why I say this: 

My Ghanaian friend who came to my school on an exchange program had to go back cos her school did not allow her to stay after her exchange program ended. Whereas some Irish girls in my school stayed after their exchange program because their university back home didn't care.Yes, you could apply as a transfer student to other American universities during your exchange year.


Let's assume that you are successful in becoming a regular student after your exchange program ends, you need to be aware of something:

- American universities have general education requirements. You have to take classes from a wide variety of areas such as humanities, history, economics, science, etc. This usually takes more than one year. Most people I know are done with their gen-eds after their second year of college. 



Transferring here will require that you take any gen-eds which you haven't already taken in your previous school, that is if your credits all get transferred. This alone at worst, could make you spend 2 years extra in school here. Sure, you could take summer classes to get rid of some classes, but you will definitely not graduate after 4 years. Maybe 5-6.


The gen-eds nonsense doesn't only affect international students. A friend of mine transferred from California to my school and this also affected her cos her former school had different gen-ed requirements.

I suggest you come to the U.S. for grad school. International graduate students also have more financial options than international undergrads.

Hugs & Kisses
B.

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